SURGICAL TREATMENT

 

Your physician may prescribe surgery if non-surgical administration does not enhance your symptoms. There are distinctive sorts of spinal surgeries accessible, and relying upon your particular case, your spine surgeon will figure out what methodology may be fitting for you. Similarly as with any surgery, a patient’s risks include age, overall health and other issues are all taken into consideration beforehand.

You may be considered for surgery if:

  • You develop progressive neurological deficits (leg weakness, foot drop, numbness in the limb)
  • You experience loss of normal bowel and/or bladder functions
  • You have difficulty standing or walking;
  • Medications and physical therapy are not effective
  • You are in reasonably good health.
  • Back and leg pain limits your normal activity, or impairs your quality of life

There are a few diverse surgical strategies that can be used, the decision of which is affected by the seriousness of your case. In a little rate of patients, spinal shakiness may require that spinal combination be performed, this choice for the most part is resolved preceding surgery. Spinal combination is an operation that makes a strong union between two or more vertebrae. Spinal combination may help with reinforcing and balancing out the spine, and may along these lines mitigate extreme and unending back torment.

Types of Surgeries:

The most widely recognized surgery in the lumbar spine is called decompressive laminectomy, in which the laminae (rooftop) of the vertebrae are expelled to make more space for the nerves. A spine surgeon may perform a laminectomy with or without combining vertebrae, or expelling part of a circle. A spinal combination with or without spinal instrumentation might be utilized to upgrade combination and backing unsteady zones of the spine.

Other type of Surgeries:

  • Laminotomy: Makes an opening in the bone (in the lamina) to diminish weight on the nerve roots.
  • Foraminotomy: Surgical opening or expansion of the hard exit for the nerve root as it leaves the spinal waterway; should be possible alone, or alongside laminotomy/laminectomy.
  • Medial Facetectomy: Expulsion of part of the feature (hard joint) which might be congested, to make more space in the spinal canal.
  • Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF): Evacuation of the degenerative disk by experiencing the lower stomach area. An auxiliary gadget, to assume the strong position of the evacuated plate, is set (bone, metal, carbon fiber, other material), stuffed with bone, so that at last combination between the bone (body of the vertebrae) above and beneath happens.
  • Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF): Evacuation of the degenerative disk by experiencing the skin on the back, expulsion of the back bone of the spinal trench, withdrawal of the nerves to get to the plate space. A basic gadget, to assume the strong position of the expelled disk, is put (bone, metal, carbon fiber, other material), pressed with bone, so that at last combination between the bone (body of the vertebrae) above and underneath happens. Like TLIF, however this is frequently done on both sides of the spine.
  • Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF): Expulsion of the degenerative disk by experiencing the skin on the back, evacuation of the back bone of the spinal trench, withdrawal of the nerves to get to the plate space. A basic gadget, to assume the steady position of the expelled plate, is set (bone, metal, carbon fiber, other material), pressed with bone, so that eventually combination between the bone (body of the vertebrae) above and underneath happens. Like PLIF, however regularly this is done on one and only side of the spine.
  • Posterolateral Fusion: Places bone joining on the back and side(s) of the spine to accomplish a fusion.
  • Instrumented Fusion: Using “hardware” (hooks, screws, other devices) to add stability to the structure for fusion.